Scarlet Scribbles

Music | Travel | Marketing | By Andrew Darwitan

One Year of Scarlet Scribbles

365 days since I first created this blog.

And here’s a quick trip down the memory lane. Key milestones:

  • 28th July 2013: First blog post. I have wanted the blog to be a repository of my thoughts on music, travel and marketing. But 12 months later, it’s mostly just travel. Key post: First Scribble
  • 19th September 2013: First SEO goldmine. Appearing on the first page of Google for Taiwan travel-related searches have brought me lots of free traffics everyday. Key posts: Taiwan: Trip Summary & Suggested Itinerary + the rest of my Taiwan reviews
  • 29th September 2013: First monetization opportunity. Advertorial, banner advertisement… I remember receiving my first business opportunity offer (and a few couple subsequent ones), which I had to decline because I didn’t feel the offer fit my vision for the blog at the time. If the right opportunity comes, I might take it. Key post: 7 Great Content Curation Tools (and Future Plan for This Blog)
  • 7th December 2013: First PageRank score. I was really delightful that one morning when I found out that Google has brought back PageRank and Scarlet Scribbles is a PR 3.0 website (OK that’s not very high, but it was an encouraging start for me). Key post: Google PageRank Update: It’s Back!
  • 15th March 2014: First viral blog post. I can’t lie, I’m very happy and proud when my Facebook’s friend news feed was flooded with my blog entry and it reached 1K shares within 3 days. =) Key post: 10 Reasons Why Medan is Food Heaven!
  • 16th March 2014: Scarlet Scribbles goes Facebook. I decided to create a Facebook account so as to make it easier for people to follow my blog. It’s still in its infancy stage, but do like Scarlet Scribbles Facebook page if you enjoy my writings!

Read more…

I Couldn’t Stop Taking Pictures: Bosphorus River Cruise Review

…because every random building here is photogenic.

Literally. Take a cruise at the Bosphorus River and point your camera at any random point of the city and here’s what you’ll likely get:

Bosphorus River Cruise, Istanbul, Turkey

Point at another random direction and… hey, where’s that castle coming from?

Rumelihisari Castle, Istanbul, Turkey

I tell you what… the above Rumelihisari Castle is not one-of-a-kind. The streets of Istanbul are literally littered with marble palaces, castles, towers, mosques and waterfront houses. Don’t believe me?

Here are just some of the iconic landmarks you can find along Bosphorus shorelines: Read more…

Turkey: The Country that Opened My Eyes to the World

Turkey holds a very special place in my heart.

It was the first place that increased my heart rate within minutes of arriving. I have always enjoyed travelling, of course, but it was just one of the many “leisure” activities to de-stress my busy works in school. Turkey showed me the endless possibilities of the world—and these possibilities have since become my personal life conquest.

Ironically, my visit to Turkey back in 2011 was meant to be about work.

It started off with a university research paper to develop a new marketing campaign model involving green behaviour. The project did well and somehow it got selected by IAMCR (International Association for Media and Communication Research) for a presentation on a global conference.

And so I embarked on the flight to Istanbul to represent my team. Read more…

Siem Reap Itinerary Guideline + Places I Wish I Visited

There’s a lot you can do in Cambodia in 3 days. In fact, taking flights and layovers into consideration, technically I had only 1 day to explore the world’s largest religious monument. It’s not enough, surely. But should you ever find yourself having to visit Siem Reap with too little time, yet too many places to visit, don’t be discouraged.

Here’s a little guideline to help you plan your trip to Angkor (Siem Reap):

Read more…

Cambodia’s Crunchy Crawlies: Andrew Vs. Exotic “Food”

Eating Exotic Food in Siem Reap, Cambodia

Spiders, snakes, frogs…

There’s no limit to what the Cambodians eat, at least back in the days of Khmer Rouge when food was in short supply and these critters could provide a steady nutritional source of protein.

When I passed by the crunchy crawlies market nearby Pub Street in Siem Reap, my mind was racing through “should I? should I not?” before I finally braced my inner survivalist to exchange some riel for a curious eating experience.

And here’s the conversation inside my head:

Read more…

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